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The Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson: A Scholarly Digital Edition

The Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson is an NEH, We the People designee and recipient of two NEH Scholarly Edition Grants, which is edited by Noelle A. Baker and Sandra Harbert Petrulionis. This edition is being edited in phases, with twenty of a projected forty-eight Almanacks published to date, the data from which populate an open-access tool that visualizes Emerson’s myriad intertextual references. To read more about this visualization interface, discover how the data was prepared, and learn how to navigate the interface, see here.

Posts

News and Updates

Posted on January 12, 2021 by Mary Moody Emerson

We’re excited to announce a new feature of the Almanacks that is publicly accessible in Women Writers Online. “Intertextual References in the Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson: Visualization for Close and Distant Reading” was developed as part of the Intertextual Networks project, a three-year NEH-funded research initiative focusing on intertextuality in early women’s writing.Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Hot off the Press!

Posted on January 17, 2017 by Mary Moody Emerson

We’re proud to see Emerson grace the cover of the NEH’s Humanities magazine, Winter 2017, which publishes our article, “‘The Youngest Person in Concord’: Mary Moody Emerson Was a Thinker, a Writer, and an Inspiration to All Who Knew Her.” Thank you to artist Sara Tyson for so beautifully capturing Emerson’s spirit “in full ferment.”

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News Flash!

Posted on September 9, 2013 by Mary Moody Emerson

We are pleased to announce that The Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson: A Scholarly Digital Edition has been awarded a second Scholarly Editions Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (http://www.neh.gov/news/press-release/2013-07-25). This award of $290,000 allows us to continue editing and encoding Emerson’s unpublished manuscript journals. Sixteen Almanack folders (c. 1804 through 1814, 1821, c. 1822, 1826, October 1855, January and [July] 1858, and two speculatively dated 1804-18teens) have been published and can be accessed in Women Writers Online at http://www.wwp.northeastern.edu/wwo/. Six of these folders can also be viewed in an experimental prototype interface, free to the public and accessible on our website, that provides an initial model of what the future Women Writers Online interface can do with our editorial work: http://www.wwp.northeastern.edu/research/projects/manuscripts/emerson/index.html.

In a June 1830 letter to nephew Ralph Waldo Emerson, Mary Moody Emerson refused to lend him an additional Almanack “fascicle” or hand-made booklet, a frustrated response to his frequent borrowing, reviewing, extracting, and retention of her manuscripts. “I send you an Almanack! ‘Catch me’– Soberly–I will not till you return the others. They are my home–the only images of having existed” (Mary Moody Emerson, The Selected Letters of Mary Moody Emerson, ed. Nancy Craig Simmons [University of Georgia Press, 1993], 287).